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Slamic Studies Book3

Intermediate Level (Grade Nine)

Author: Dr. Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips

SKU: BK0664-CP
$8.00
excluding shipping

Shipping Weight (LB): 1

Author: Dr. Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips

Binding: Paperback

Pages: 196

Size: 9.25 x 6.75 x 0.45

Publishers Note: Dr. Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips was born in Jamaica, but grew up in Canada where he accepted Islaam in 1972. He completed a diploma in Arabic and a B.A. from the College of Islamic Disciplines (Usool ad-Deen) at the Islamic University of Madeenah in 1979. At the University of Riyadh, College of Education he completed and M.A. in Islamic Theology in 1985 and in the department of Islamic Studies at the University of Wales, U.K., he also completed a Ph.D. in Islamic Theology in 1994. He taught Islamic Education and Arabic in private schools in Riyadh for over ten years. Between 1992 and 1994, Dr. Bilal established and lectured in the graduate and undergraduate Departments of Islamic Studies in the College of Education of Shariff Kabunsun Islamic University in Cotabato City, Mindanao, Philippines. Since 1994 he has founded and directed The Islamic Information Center in Dubai, U.A.E. and the Department of Foreign Languages at Dar al Fatah Islamic Press in Sharjah, U.A.E. Among his published works are translations of Ibn Taymeeyah's Essay on the Jinn, The Devil's Deception and Arabic Calligraphy in Manuscripts. He has also co-authored Polygamy in Islam, and authored Evolution of Islamic Law, Tafseer Soorah al-Hujuraat, The Ansaar Cult, Fundamentals of Tawheed, Salvation Through Repentance, Islamic Studies Book 1, Islamic Studies Book 2, Hajj and 'Umrah According to Qur'aan and Sunnah, Islamic Rules on Menstruation, Arabic Reading and Writing Made Easy, Arabic Grammar Made Easy, The Purpose of Creation, The Best in Islaam, Dream Interpretation and Funeral Rites in Islaam.

Printing: One Color

Net Weight (LB): 0.77

Country of Printing: India

Full Description: This text is based on the Islamic Studies syllabus covering the following four major areas of study: Tawheed, Tafseer, Hadeeth and Fiqh. It is therefore assumed that the "Qur'aanic skills" of reading and recitaion would be covered in Arabic classes, and "Islaamic History," including the Seerah, would be included either in the Social Studies syllabus as a major topic, or taught as a separate subject. Aims of the Course 1. To acquaint the student with the uniqueness of the Islaamic concept of God and how it affects humankind's relationship with God, with other human beings and with the creation in which the live. This may be achieved through the study of Tawheed (Islaamic Monotheism). 2. To introduce the student to the meanings of the final book of revelation, the Qur'aan, and their relevance to daily life, as opposed to the ritual recitation of the Qur'aanic text without any realization of its meanings whatsoever. This could be developed during the study of tafseers ( commentaries ) of the soorahs (Qur'aanic chapters). 3. To familiarize the student with his/her Islaamic rights and obligations and present a clear and authentic picture of how they may be fulfilled. This would best be accomplished in the detailed study of Fiqh (Islaamic Law) and Tawheed. 4. To develop in the student a realization that Islaam is built on firm, clear, logical principles and that it is not merely a collection of irrelavant cultural practices handed down from earlier generations. This can be done through the study of the sciences (Usool) of Hadeeth (Prophetic traditions), Fiqh and Tafseer. 5. To identify and build an Islaamic character in the student through the study of Islaamic ethics, which is, no doubt, an essential component of any Islaamic Education curriculum. This field of study is to be found in the Prophetic traditions (Hadeeth), which have been carefully chosen for in-depth study and discussion at all levels. Method of Presentation The order in which the topics have been arranged is based on the aims and their priority. Tawheed represents the most fundamental principle of Islaam, while the teachings of Islaam are based on the Qur'aan (the understanding of which is called Tafseer), and the Sunnah (the teachings of the Prophet (Sallallahu Alayhi Wa Sallam) contained in hadeeths). The application of the teachings falls within the framework of Fiqh (Islamic Law). The teacher, however, is free to vary the order according to the class response and his or her personnal preference, as long as the whole syllabus is covered. Arabic terminology should be used and properly pronounced wherever possible, and students be held responsible for understanding the important transliterated terms mentioned in the text. Terms written in Arabic script should not be emphasized unless the whole class is able to read and write Arabic script. Accordingly, the teacher's treatment of Arabic terms should take into account the fact that, in any given grade, there may be students who are raw beginners in Arabic. In this way, the teacher may avoid double penalization of a student, whereby a poor mark in Arabic authomatically results in a poor mark in Islaamic Education. Discussion of each of the topics of the Syllabus should be encouraged among the students, and reasoned explanations should be given to their questions where possible. Ample time should also be allotted at the end of each class for general questions, as Islaamic Education covers all aspects of human life and the Islaamic Studies teacher will also be required to fulfil the role of counsellor or student advisor. The Islaamic Studies teacher should attempt to find answers to all the students' questions by making personal research using advanced reference materials and by contacting outstanding Islaamic scholars in their region. The student may also be given individual or group term research projects on the topics to further stimulate discussion and interest.

Weight: 1

Shipping Weight (LB): 1

Author: Dr. Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips

Binding: Paperback

Pages: 196

Size: 9.25 x 6.75 x 0.45

Publishers Note: Dr. Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips was born in Jamaica, but grew up in Canada where he accepted Islaam in 1972. He completed a diploma in Arabic and a B.A. from the College of Islamic Disciplines (Usool ad-Deen) at the Islamic University of Madeenah in 1979. At the University of Riyadh, College of Education he completed and M.A. in Islamic Theology in 1985 and in the department of Islamic Studies at the University of Wales, U.K., he also completed a Ph.D. in Islamic Theology in 1994. He taught Islamic Education and Arabic in private schools in Riyadh for over ten years. Between 1992 and 1994, Dr. Bilal established and lectured in the graduate and undergraduate Departments of Islamic Studies in the College of Education of Shariff Kabunsun Islamic University in Cotabato City, Mindanao, Philippines. Since 1994 he has founded and directed The Islamic Information Center in Dubai, U.A.E. and the Department of Foreign Languages at Dar al Fatah Islamic Press in Sharjah, U.A.E. Among his published works are translations of Ibn Taymeeyah's Essay on the Jinn, The Devil's Deception and Arabic Calligraphy in Manuscripts. He has also co-authored Polygamy in Islam, and authored Evolution of Islamic Law, Tafseer Soorah al-Hujuraat, The Ansaar Cult, Fundamentals of Tawheed, Salvation Through Repentance, Islamic Studies Book 1, Islamic Studies Book 2, Hajj and 'Umrah According to Qur'aan and Sunnah, Islamic Rules on Menstruation, Arabic Reading and Writing Made Easy, Arabic Grammar Made Easy, The Purpose of Creation, The Best in Islaam, Dream Interpretation and Funeral Rites in Islaam.

Printing: One Color

Net Weight (LB): 0.77

Country of Printing: India

Full Description: This text is based on the Islamic Studies syllabus covering the following four major areas of study: Tawheed, Tafseer, Hadeeth and Fiqh. It is therefore assumed that the "Qur'aanic skills" of reading and recitaion would be covered in Arabic classes, and "Islaamic History," including the Seerah, would be included either in the Social Studies syllabus as a major topic, or taught as a separate subject. Aims of the Course 1. To acquaint the student with the uniqueness of the Islaamic concept of God and how it affects humankind's relationship with God, with other human beings and with the creation in which the live. This may be achieved through the study of Tawheed (Islaamic Monotheism). 2. To introduce the student to the meanings of the final book of revelation, the Qur'aan, and their relevance to daily life, as opposed to the ritual recitation of the Qur'aanic text without any realization of its meanings whatsoever. This could be developed during the study of tafseers ( commentaries ) of the soorahs (Qur'aanic chapters). 3. To familiarize the student with his/her Islaamic rights and obligations and present a clear and authentic picture of how they may be fulfilled. This would best be accomplished in the detailed study of Fiqh (Islaamic Law) and Tawheed. 4. To develop in the student a realization that Islaam is built on firm, clear, logical principles and that it is not merely a collection of irrelavant cultural practices handed down from earlier generations. This can be done through the study of the sciences (Usool) of Hadeeth (Prophetic traditions), Fiqh and Tafseer. 5. To identify and build an Islaamic character in the student through the study of Islaamic ethics, which is, no doubt, an essential component of any Islaamic Education curriculum. This field of study is to be found in the Prophetic traditions (Hadeeth), which have been carefully chosen for in-depth study and discussion at all levels. Method of Presentation The order in which the topics have been arranged is based on the aims and their priority. Tawheed represents the most fundamental principle of Islaam, while the teachings of Islaam are based on the Qur'aan (the understanding of which is called Tafseer), and the Sunnah (the teachings of the Prophet (Sallallahu Alayhi Wa Sallam) contained in hadeeths). The application of the teachings falls within the framework of Fiqh (Islamic Law). The teacher, however, is free to vary the order according to the class response and his or her personnal preference, as long as the whole syllabus is covered. Arabic terminology should be used and properly pronounced wherever possible, and students be held responsible for understanding the important transliterated terms mentioned in the text. Terms written in Arabic script should not be emphasized unless the whole class is able to read and write Arabic script. Accordingly, the teacher's treatment of Arabic terms should take into account the fact that, in any given grade, there may be students who are raw beginners in Arabic. In this way, the teacher may avoid double penalization of a student, whereby a poor mark in Arabic authomatically results in a poor mark in Islaamic Education. Discussion of each of the topics of the Syllabus should be encouraged among the students, and reasoned explanations should be given to their questions where possible. Ample time should also be allotted at the end of each class for general questions, as Islaamic Education covers all aspects of human life and the Islaamic Studies teacher will also be required to fulfil the role of counsellor or student advisor. The Islaamic Studies teacher should attempt to find answers to all the students' questions by making personal research using advanced reference materials and by contacting outstanding Islaamic scholars in their region. The student may also be given individual or group term research projects on the topics to further stimulate discussion and interest.

Weight: 1

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